NxWitness ver5.0 about reserved space setting

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    Norman - Nx Support

    こんにちは Hiroki Natori,

    In 5.0, you can use the following URLs to access the advanced settings:

    For system specific settings:

    https://<serverIp>:7001//#/settings/advanced

    For example:

    https://192.168.1.10:7001/#/settings/advanced

    For server specific settings:

    https://<serverIp>:7001/#/settings/servers/<serverId>?advanced=

    For example:

    https://192.168.1.10:7001/#/settings/servers/ced42fd2-d7ee-c193-8ddc-a0f820b71e24?advanced=

    If you open the WebAdmin, and select the applicable server (1), you can add ?advanced= to the URL (2) and scroll down to change the values for the reserved space (3).

    すてきな一日を

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    Hiroki Natori

    Hi Norman,

    Thank you for the detailed explanation.
    I understand how to set reserved space.

    I have one question about the behavior of reserved space.
    Is it correct to assume that the reserved space is an area that is not used at all?
    *The purpose of the NxWitness reserved space is to hold the reserved space as a free space ?

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    Norman - Nx Support

    HI Hiroki Natori,

    When the reserved space is set within the WebAdmin, the reserved space won't be available for the Nx Witness mediaserver application, but it could be used by other applications. Typically, this isn't an issue, since in general people use dedicated storage for their VMS.

    In case it is an issue, reserved space could be set on through the operating system.

    The purpose of reserved space on a hard disk drive is to reserve a portion of the disk's capacity for use by the operating system and other system files. This reserved space is typically used for system backups, file restoration, and other system-related tasks, and is not generally intended for use by regular users. Additionally, reserved space is a safety feature, as it can be used to prevent the disk from becoming completely full, which can cause system crashes or other problems.

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    Hiroki Natori

    Hi Norman

    I understand your explanation, thank you.

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